New Mexico AYP 2011: Late-Summer Reading About Our Future (i.e., Florida)

In the last post, your humble blogger noted that he would be crawling under a rock to avoid all so-called discussion about New Mexico’s standardized test scoring.

Well, there’s lots of time for reading when safely covered by a solid rock, especially if you bring a good, strong light with you. And/or a laptop with tremendous, rock-proof, wireless.

After some late-late-Saturday Night research (God, I’m such a dork), I think I’m adequately armed for a nice, cozy time with my fellow under-rock denizens. I figure that since our new sorta-kinda Education Secretary, Hanna Skandera, is fresh from the unmitigated miracle (just ask Jeb Bush) that is Florida’s educational reforms, I’d take a longish look to see what they’re doing.

And here’s what they are doing:

Of course all this under-the-rock reading must include two meditations:  1.  It’s really hard to find out exactly what the Florida reforms cost.  I wonder why…; 2. All this weighty blah, blah, blah really does come down to what’s in the test and grading. For instance, Florida’s scores on their state “FCAT” seem to show the reforms are working, yet Florida scores on the national test, the NAEP, have stayed flat or gone down for Florida high schoolers.  Is it possible that successful “reform” is really just a matter of controlling the garbage (test difficulty, “cut score” determination, etc.) that goes into creating a testing-industrial complex?
Happy Late-Summer reading, everyone.  I’m off to go work on my pale, pasty-skin look.

2 thoughts on “New Mexico AYP 2011: Late-Summer Reading About Our Future (i.e., Florida)

  1. “For instance, Florida’s scores on their state “FCAT” seem to show the reforms are working, yet Florida scores on the national test, the NAEP, haven’t stayed flat or gone down for Florida high schoolers.”

    DId you mean to say …”have stay flat or gone down”….?

  2. Michelle:

    Should we go with paying you on a hourly basis for editing, or simply so many dollars per correction?

    The per correction rate is gonna have to be pretty darn low, I’m afraid. Thanks.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s