Edu-Corruption and the Seven Second Delay

In broadcasting, TV/Radio delays programming for seven seconds or so when the show might get to doing some cussin’ or some such.  Public policy, along with the legal system, provides its own delay, one that wittingly or unwittingly, depending on one’s point of view, allows time for the politicians to get out of the mess before the “bad guys” do the time.

Back in the “No Child Left Behind” heyday of forced tutoring, mid-to-late 2000s, mine and other public schools had these rather shady-looking folks come by offering “tutoring” to everybody at prices too low for teachers to consider doing it.  Guess the low wages were still high enough to warrant some smarter people than I to scam the system out of millions of dollars.  Come to think of it, maybe there weren’t that many “tutors” running around ABQ either, considering all the money at stake.

Ah…the beauty of privatizing public education.  Such boondoggle opportunities!

Can anyone say Pearson Education?  Riverside?  Mc-Graw Hill?  Harcourt?

Of course those inevitable indictments and convictions will come down long after Arne Duncan has left.  Just as the architects of the NCLB tutoring program are now creating awful paintings, out of office or even literally dead.  It’s a smash and grab life, public policy, particularly when new money and private entities are concerned.

Right now, we’re up to our educational necks in the standardized testing boondoggle sewage.  We’re gonna need a straw to breathe pretty soon, if you know what I mean.  Wonder who will be going to jail for all this sometime around 2019 or so?  I’m betting, heavily, it won’t be Arne Duncan.

 

P.S.:  The Pearson “gag order” story is very much worth following.  It’s not exactly quality capitalism when the buyer (taxpayers) can’t see the product before purchasing.  So what kind of economic structure is in place when the buyer can’t see after purchasing?  I guess Pearson would say that’s optimal capitalism.  Kinda like their “PARCC Open Field Test” in which they demanded users have technology in place that far exceed/differ the typical end user, when such practices would only result in going out of business in the “real world.”  So much more economic fun when you’re dealing with government programs than the “real world,” ain’t it Pearson?

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